Wednesday, April 12, 2017

SGO Annual Meeting Research Review and ASK the Docs - April 12, 2017




During this month's chat we discussed research reported on at the 2017 SGO Annual Meeting. We had 29 participants and over 1.5 million impressions.

If you would like to read the complete transcript please visit this Symplur webpage. Analytics may be found here.

Below please find some sample answers to the questions we asked during the chat.

T1: What #SGOMtg presentations did you personally find of most interest? Also, what were some of the "hot topics" of discussion?
  • PARP inhibitors for RX of #ovariancancer continue to be a hot topic at #SGOMtg
  • Was glad to see the study re: the HPV vaccine dosing - supporting that it can be reduced from 3 doses to 2
  • lots of imp news. See my OCRFA SGO report https://t.co/bABRIboozG
  • Very interesting to see the activity of #PARPi across all pts regardless of #BRCA status. Strongest effect in #BRCA mutant or HRD
  • Sadly, maintenance treatment with taxanes in the upfront setting for #ovariancancer did not improve survival compared to placebo
  • Sexual Health Ed Forum w/Don Dizon & Joanne Rush fantastic! tech info + how to talk abt sex & feelings abt talking abt sex 
T2: Which #SGOMtg studies do you think will most interest patients? Were there findings survivors need to take immediate note of? 

T3: What was the #Trials4GynCancerNow campaign which took part during the #SGOMtg? How does gyn cancer trial access impact care? 
  • Fewer trials means slower progress. Also means less access to novel therapies for patients who have limited options. #gyncsm 
  • Our #gyncsm blog post https://t.co/JvU8IHk3oi
  •  restructuring cooperative groups impacted number too
  • This is a huge issue - #GynCancers are no longer the priority of the cooperative group
  • 90% reduction in phase 3 clinical trial participation is startling to me
T4: What was something you learned or were reminded of during #SGOMtg that you plan to implement or follow-up on? 
  • earlier palliative care study was important for patients to hear as well as health care providers
  • This has been shown in multiple cancer types - earlier palliative care involvement yields better outcomes
  • palliative (or supportive) care is valuable in dealing w/ side effects of cancer and treatment no matter where in journey
  • There is a big push 4 pt reported outcomes - a great way to measure impact on #QOL - especially when drugs have similar outcomes 
T5: For our last topic, we'll let our participants ask questions they have about gynecologic cancer research. Also, what do you want to see research resources focused on? what are some gaps in research?
  •  So many approved PARPi for treatment and maintenance, is there a preferred order of use? What do we know about serial PARPi S/Es? These are questions that we need to answer- there are a few differences in first use side effects - we don't know about serial 
  • I'm wondering what the mood was like about the future of cancer research funding and the cancer moonshot initiative? I know the young researchers at my NCI Comprehensive Ca center were worried about support.
  • Is any research being done on psych wellbeing, supportive care mindfulness etc combined with meds? I tend to see studies like that coming out of Oncology Nursing Society ONS 
  • I'd like to see more resources dedicate to ensuring current research can be more easily implemented in practice
  • Good to see some research on rarer gyn cancers like this one on Vulvar cancer https://t.co/jTCQC18Boy 
Abstracts from the SGO Annual Meeting may be found at
https://sgo.confex.com/sgo/2017/meetingapp.cgi/ModuleSessionsByDay/0
For addition Resources, please scroll down.


Patients and caregivers are invited to continue our discussion on the Smart Patients platform at https://www.smartpatients.com/gyncsm

We hope you will join us on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 as we discuss Womanhood, Femininity and Cancer. 

See you then.

Dee
#gyncsm Co-Founder


RESOURCES

Highlights from the 2017 SGO meeting- OCRFA, Annie Ellis 
https://ocrfa.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Ellis-2017-SGO-summary.pdf

Summary article from @cancernetwrk
http://www.cancernetwork.com/sgo-2017

@cure_magazine Highlights from #SGOmtg
http://www.curetoday.com/conferences/sgo-2017?p=2

@StephanieVBlank of @NYULMC will present the latest info on #ovariancancer from @SGO_org 's annual meeting: https://www.sharecancersupport.org/ovarian-cancer/educational-programs/?lm=https://share-web.fcny.org/listings/programs/ovarian_cancer_what_s/?bu=https://share-web.fcny.org/listings/programs/%3Faction%3Dview%26category%3D128175%26location%3D-%26language%3Den-us%23ovarian-cancer-what-s-new

#Trials4GynCancerNow campaign
http://gyncsm.blogspot.com/2017/03/advocating-for-gynecologic-oncology.html

Crisis in Gyn Cancer Trials
https://www.sgo.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/SGO-Clinical-Trial-Crisis-FINAL.pdf

Foundation for Womens Cancer: Closer Look
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVObSzkf_B0&feature=youtu.be

#CTAW2017 (Clinical Trials Awareness Week) chat on Tue May 5th at 1pmET 

Past #SGOMtg Research Recap #gyncsm chats: 2014 https://t.co/wUiAM3hp9K 2015 https://t.co/w1ZwfH1xQH and 2016 https://t.co/5sqJnrCGNY

Tweet summaries from #SGOMtg  @womenofteal 's blog http://womenofteal.blogspot.com/ - See March 2017 posts




Friday, April 7, 2017

April 12th Chat: SGO Annual Meeting Research Review and ASK the Docs



This month's #gyncsm chat, on April 12th at 9:00pm EST, will focus on research news from the 2017 SGO Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer including a segment we call ASK the DOC. 

The SGO (Society of Gynecologic Oncology) Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer (#SGOmtgwas held in National Harbor, MD on March 12th to the 15th. You may access the meeting agenda, speakers and presentations by visiting:
https://sgo.confex.com/sgo/2017/meetingapp.cgi/Home/0

We will begin our chat on Wednesday by discussing research results reported at this year's annual meeting and then have participants "ask our Docs" questions. 

These questions will guide our chat: 


T1: What #SGOMtg presentations did you personally find of most interest? Also, what were some of the "hot topics" of discussion?

T2: Which #SGOMtg studies do you think will most interest patients? Were there findings survivors need to take immediate note of? 

T3: What was the #Trials4GynCancerNow campaign which took part during the #SGOMtg? How does gyn cancer trial access impact care? 

T4: What was something you learned or were reminded of during #SGOMtg that you plan to implement or follow-up on? 

T5: For our last topic, we'll let our participants ask questions they have about gynecologic cancer research.


If you would like a preview of some of the research presented at the meeting, please read this excellent report on Highlights from the 2017 Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer by research advocate, Annie Ellis (@Stigetta) or visit the Cure Magazine Conference page for eleven articles discussing research presented at the meeting. Or view the Foundation for Womens Cancer video below. 





See you on the 12th!

Dee
Co-moderator #gyncsm 

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Advocating for Gynecologic Oncology Clinical Trials - #Trials4GynCancerNow

The SGO (Society of Gynecologic Oncology) is conducting their Annual Meeting March 12-15, 2017. You can follow research presented at the meeting by following the hashtag #SGOMtg on Twitter. Note that we'll discuss SGO Meeting highlights during our April 12th #gyncsm chat

During their annual meeting, SGO will be conducting a social media campaign to advocate for gynecologic cancer clinical trials. #gynscm is please to support this campaign and we hope you will join us.

There has been a steep decline in the number of clinical trials in gynecologic cancer since the restructuring of the NCI-sponsored cooperative groups in 2012.  Information about the campaign can be found in this SGO document.

You can join us as we support this campaign by tweeting the following starting on Monday, March 13th at 9:35amEST:
Women with #gyncancer deserve progress. Fund trials now @realDonaldTrump #Trials4GynCancerNow @SGO_org

Feel free to send additional tweets using #Trials4GynCancerNow to encourage increased funding of NCI trials. 

Thanks, 

Dee
#gyncsm Co-Founder 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Gyn Cancer Health Disparities Chat -March 8th, International Womens Day

Today, March 8th, International Womens Day, we chatted about Gyn Cancer Health Disparities. We were pleased to have a number of new participants join our community for this chat. We had twenty-six participants and over 1.8 million impressions. You may find more analytics here.

For our discussion we used the NCI definition of cancer health disparities "adverse differences in cancer incidence (new cases), cancer prevalence (all existing cases), cancer death (mortality), cancer survivorship, and burden of cancer or related health conditions that exist among specific population groups in the United States. "

Below, please find a sample of the responses to our questions. To read the full transcript please visit this page on Symplur.

T1: What are some of the factors that contribute to cancer health disparities?

  • Lack of access to regular screenings puts underserved groups at a higher risk for developing cancer-related malignancies
  • Medical "literacy." How close you live to healthcare, especially great healthcare, and how willing you are to go there. Also income, health insurance, and how good that insurance is
  • There are historic factors, race, socio-economic, edu, & access, but there's also the not talked about, systemic & provider,
  • Poverty, isolation, lower socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, lack of insurance, disenfranchised, mental illness
  • Racial/ethnic differences, genetic factors, rural-urban status--both cultural norms spatial access concerns--, socioeconomics
  • Poverty, socioeconomic status, poor education, mistrust of medical profession (warranted in some groups

T2: What are some of the effects of health disparities you see in the experience of gyn cancer diagnosis, treatment, and beyond? 

  • So many ways that disparities rear their ugly heads- delayed diagnosis, inadequate care, inadequate access to supportive care
  • In poorer comms, est 24% of providers admit they don't even discuss CATs or survivorship w/ minorities
  • With cervical cancer and precancer, access to screening and follow-up! when something found definitely impacted by disparities
  • Studies have shown <50% of women w/ ovarian cancer meeting genetic testing criteria, are referred for genetics + differences by race
  • Some women--like those in rural areas-- sometimes don't get regular pap smears leading to later stage at dx and poorer outcomes 
  • Health disparities, particularly with access, results in fewer minorities participating in #clinicaltrials
  • Much of research blames patient Social Determinants Of Health 4 disparities but lack of culturally-appropriate & buy-in providers is definitely a factor


T3: Which populations are most affected by these cancer disparities? What are some groups and resources addressing the issues?

  • Health disparities also exist among LGBT population - summary article by G. Quinn at Moffitt: https://t.co/5eD2xDBk4a
  • Recent disparities data shows African American women as 40% more likely to develop #cervicalcancer
  • Risk for health disparity= anyone! Gyn cancers can be rare, and not all health care systems are created equally knowledgeable.
  • African American women are disproportionately affected by cancer disparities. Esp rates of increase
  • The recent re-adjustment on cervical cancer stats showed disparity greater than thought for African American and Hispanic women 
  • There are also biological factors contributing to disparities in cancer #uterinecancer p53 & USC 

T4: What role does past research play in how disparities arise? What role does future research play in addressing disparities? 

  • Great opportunity to reduce disparities through CBPR and community engaged efforts in addtion to NGOs, NCI, and other orgs
  • Cancer research already limited for women. Diversity within the women studied is a barrier.
  • Researchers should make intentional effort to include diverse populations in studies,not just the patients conveniently available
  • It is on the investigator to include underserved groups - it can't just be a "convenience sample"
  • For historic data to play a role in epidemiology research, data has to be actionable. We need better analyst and data scientist 
  • @SGO_org is launching a campaign around #Trials4GynCancerNow Check the #gyncsm blog heading into next week to support
  • Henrietta Lacks! Highlighting past research transgressions can,hopefully, reduce future disparities, improve trust in research
  • The #CAPfoundation is trying to help with screening in populations underserved populations https://t.co/DpeOQpr867 
  • Researchers can also study ways to change or reduce cancer prevention, diagnosis & tx disparities to help prevent future cancers
  • @mdandersonnews has a department that focuses on how to increase minority involvement in clinical trials and research studies 

T5: How can we work together to address and reduce gyn cancer health disparities in our own communities and beyond?

  • As a @GeneticCouns, while only one person, I help underserved women access counseling and testing
  • continue to raise awareness so that increased funds can be directed toward this issue
  • We know patients of gyn oncs better outcomes. Train more gyn oncs for underserved communities
  • 5 Work to encourage funding 4 GynCa programs that support SDOH initiatives. Insist disparity disruptors get funded
  • Promote #clinicaltrial awareness - Less than 2% of NCI studies have enough minorities to meet NIH goals
  •  Increased collaboration in academia and beyond --partner instead of compete for research/outreach $-->synergistic research etc
  • The @C3Prize seeks answers to these cancer treatment challenges annually. Collaborate on a project. Get it funded.
  • partnering with others who are passionate, like @ShewithLynch to raise awareness of disparities in hereditary cancer
  • hopefully support for physicians to provide telemed might move the needle in that direction to ⬆ access
  • working on a government and health policy level can help reduce health disparities... healthcare in flux=opportunity to improve

We ended out chat as we always do with Today I Learned. Some of today's thoughts were:

  • Final thought. Be brave enough to discuss disparities in professional health comms. Our greatest resource is our resolve to "care"
  • TIL that our community= passionate re: eliminating gyn cancer disparities! We can join together to raise awareness & promote change
  • TIL health Disparities are deep within the fabric of of health care and will require education and active reform. 
  • TIL: The complexity of health disparities is great - but the passion to eliminate these disparities exists and will drive us forward
Please scroll down to find the links to topic resources shared during this chat.

Remember you can always continue the conversation on the Smart Patients Platform ( https://www.smartpatients.com/partners/gyncsm  ).

The SGO Meeting (#SGOMtg) takes place from March 12-15. @SGO_org is launching a campaign around #Trials4GynCancerNow. Check the #gyncsm blog heading into next week to support this effort.

We hope you will join us on April 12, 2017 as we discuss research results reported on at the SGO meeting during our SGO Research Review and ASK the Docs Chat.

See you then.

Dee
#gyncsm Co-Founder


RESOURCES

NCI Cancer Health Disparities Fact Sheet (including cervical cancer overview)
https://www.cancer.gov/about-nci/organization/crchd/cancer-health-disparities-fact-sheet

Approaching Health Disparities From a Population Perspective: The National Institutes of Health Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2509592/
Disparities in Gynecological Malignancies https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4761838/

Racial Disparities in Cervical Cancer, Worse Than We Thought http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.30501/full

SGO Taskforce Report on Gyn Cancer Disparities https://www.sgo.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Collins-et-al.pdf

CDC Health Disparities and Inequality reports https://www.cdc.gov/minorityhealth/chdireport.html

Cancer and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender/Transsexual, and Queer/Questioning Populations (LGBTQ) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4609168/

National LGBT Cancer Network @cancerLGBT http://cancer-network.org/
Society of Gynecologic Oncology @SGO_org
National Society of Genetic Counselors @GeneticCouns
@pinkredribbon
http://thelancet.com/series/womens-cancers

NY Times: Wider gap in cervical cancer deaths https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/23/health/cervical-cancer-united-states-death-toll.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=2

Cancer Mortality in the Mississippi Delta Region: Descriptive Epidemiology and Needed Future Research and Interventions http://muse.jhu.edu/article/648763

CAP Foundation's "See, Test & Treat" partners with Day of the Latina Woman program in Houston https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7wysxxdmUAM&feature=youtu.be

Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials - Race-, Sex-, and Age-Based Disparities http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/198896

Diversity in Clinical and Biomedical Research: A Promise Yet to Be Fulfilled http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1001918

NCI launches study of African-American cancer survivors https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nci-launches-study-african-american-cancer-survivors

Does equal treatment yield equal outcomes? The impact of race on survival in epithelial ovarian cancerhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2612941/

Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Health Disparities Research
https://www.cancer.gov/research/areas/disparities

In Cancer Trials, Minorities Face Extra Hurdles
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/23/health/cancer-trials-immunotherapy.html?_r=1

#SGOMtg
Abstracts https://www.sgo.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/SGO-AM17-abstract_titles.pdf
Late-abstracts https://www.sgo.org/education/annual-meeting-on-womens-cancer/annual-meeting-late-breaking-abstracts/
General info https://www.sgo.org/education/annual-meeting-on-womens-cancer/


Friday, March 3, 2017

March 8, 2017 - Gyn Cancer Health Disparities



Healthcare disparities can effect various populations in the U.S. due to a number of reasons - economic, cultural, racial, geographic, age or gender. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) defines cancer health disparities as "adverse differences in cancer incidence (new cases), cancer prevalence (all existing cases), cancer death (mortality), cancer survivorship, and burden of cancer or related health conditions that exist among specific population groups in the United States." Studies have shown that disparities in diagnosis, treatment, access and clinical trial participation impact the lives of women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer. During this month's #gyncsm chat we will discuss Gynecologic Cancer Health Disparities and ways to reduce them.

Please join us as we discuss this issue using these topic questions:

T1: What are some of the factors that contribute to cancer health disparities?

T2: What are some of the effects of health disparities you see in the experience of gyn cancer diagnosis, treatment, and beyond? 

T3: Which populations are most affected by these cancer disparities? What are some groups and resources addressing the issues?

T4: What role does past research play in how disparities arise? What role does future research play in addressing disparities? 

T5: How can we work together to address and reduce gyn cancer health disparities in our own communities and beyond?


Check this NCI page ( https://www.cancer.gov/about-nci/organization/crchd/cancer-health-disparities-fact-sheet) for more information on Cancer Health Disparities.

See you on March 8th, which is also International Women's Day!
Check here to see the chat time in your local time zone.


New to tweetchats? See:


Dee
#gyncsm Co-Founder

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

HPV and Cervical Cancer Chat - 2/8/17

During this month's chat discussion on HPV and Cervical Cancer the community learned vital information about screening, vaccination, fertility and how to better educate women on the risks and treatment of cervical cancer. We were joined by forty-nine participants and had over 2.4 million impressions.

Here is a sample of the responses to our topic questions.
T1: Which HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) types cause cervical cancer? How does the HPV vaccination prevent cancer? 
  • HPV causes nearly all cases of cervical cancer. While there are over 150 HPV types, ~14 are known to cause cervical cancer.
  • Usually HPV 16 and 18. But several others. Vaccine prevent against many cancer and wart causing types of HPV
  • Just because you are infected with #HPV - doesn't mean that you will DEFINITELY develop #cervicalcancer
  • Because we can't be sure who will develop cancer - best to PREVENT with #HPVaccine
  • It is also important to note that the HPV infection can develop years after exposure
  • @theNCI comprehensive cancer ctrs statement on HPV vaccination tinyurl.com/je8tujx

T2: What other health issues and cancers are associated with HPV? Why is the vaccine recommended for both boys and girls?
  • @GYNcancer :vaccinate both girls & boys between 11- 13 years. 2 doses . Vacc + screening prevent virtually all CervCa
  • Other HPV-related cancers include: vagina, vulva, penis, anus, rectum, and oropharynx (cancers of the back of the throat) 
  • As of 10/2016, CDC recommends that 11-12 year-olds receive 2 doses of HPV vaccine at least 6 months apart instead of 3
  • Cigarette smoking and conditions that lower the immune system like steroids [increase risk]
  • Cervical dysplasia (not yet cancer) can be as emotionally and mentally taxing for young women
  • The best time to vaccinate is well before any sexual skin to skin contact. 

T3: What are the tools we have to catch cervical cancer in the pre-cancer and early stages? What do we need to know re: guidelines? 
  •  If there is concern based on pap and/or HPV test, then colposcopy (a closer look) is done in office.
  •  HPV test should be first test for cervical cancer screening. Detects 14 high-risk HPV types. via @US_FDA
  • Continued importance of pap/HPV screening based on ASCCP guidelines--this and vaccination best way to protect 
  • ACOG infographic on screening acog.org/Patients/FAQs/…
  •  Imp- Guidelines are based on average risk and should be starting point of discussion with your doctor about your personal risk!
T4: What are options for fertility preservation? What fertility and general resources can help women diagnosed with cervical disease? 

T5: There is still a lot of stigma surrounding women's cancers. How can we ensure ALL women receive the necessary education.

  • Take stigma off of HPV as a "sexually transmitted" disease and change to "human contact" 
  • Keep talking about it until it's not a stigma - it's just a health condition to treat!
  • Recent news @NewsHour @DrJenCaudle #cervical cancer kills more african american women http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/cervical-cancer-killing-many-african-american-women-thought/ 
  • Australia has implemented school-based vaccination w/ success in vaccine rates and decreased disease
  • It would help if our education about bodies included penis, vagina, ovaries, testes, etc as consistently as we say "elbow."
  • More education programs in junior high and high schools. School vaccination programs 
  • Celebrities with cervical cancer diagnosis speaking out 
  • Organizations like American Indian Cancer Foundation americanindiancancer.org/cervical help educate and raise awareness
  • Organizations like @iamcervivor work to share stories - stories touch emotions and emotion leads to actions
  • Cancer treatment is far worse than the "stigma" of people knowing you're sexually active




Please scroll down for additional resources. To read the entire transcript please click here.

Remember that patients and caregivers are invited to continue our #gyncsm discussions on the Smart Patients platform at https://www.smartpatients.com/partners/gyncsm  .

We invite you to join us next month, Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at 9pm ET for our chat on Gyn Cancer Disparities. 

See you next month! And please use the #gyncsm hashtag to share important information with our community.

Dee
Co-Founder #gyncsm

RESOURCES

@GYNCancer HPV Facts and testing http://www.foundationforwomenscancer.org/educational-materials/cervical-cancer-edmaterials/

@CDCgov has info and resources about #HPV available at     https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/whatishpv.html

ASCCP guidelines available for public http://www.asccp.org/asccp-guidelines

SGO webpage about HPV with good resources sgo.org/hpv/

FDA Resource - Improving odds of cervical health fda.gov/forconsumers/c…

Fertility Preservation in Patients With Cervical Cancer | Cancer Network  http://www.cancernetwork.com/oncology-journal/fertility-preservation-patients-cervical-cancer

#cervicalcancer rates and disparities nytimes.com/2017/01/23/hea…

Time Magazine : Cervical Cancer Rates http://time.com/4643570/cervical-cancer-death-rates-study/

HPV vaccine: A smart way to protect kids from cancer  https://www.mdanderson.org/publications/cancerwise/2013/06/hpv-vaccine-a-smart-way-to-protect-kids-from-cancer.html

How to Talk to Your Kids about HPV https://www.mdanderson.org/publications/focused-on-health/january-2017/HPV-vaccine-talk-to-your-kids.html

Treatments for cervical cell changes: cancer.gov/types/cervical…

Who should be vaccinated against #HPV, and when? Tips from our Dr. Haddad: http://blog.dana-farber.org/insight/2017/01/who-should-get-the-hpv-vaccine/  

Friday, February 3, 2017

Feb. 8, 2017 HPV and Cervical Cancer Chat


While January is officially Cervical Health Month, we're going to continue sharing information and discussing HPV (Human Papilloma Virus), the HPV vaccination, and cervical cancer treatment and survivorship right into February - and beyond.

Cervical cancer forms in the cells lining the cervix. It generally takes several years for normal cells to develop into cervical cancer. The Pap test detects those precancerous cells and the HPV test detects the presence of high-risk HPV types known to lead to cervical cancer.

The most recent numbers available on the incidence of cervical cancer in the U.S. is from 2013. In that year, 11,955 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer (CDC ). The five-year survival rate is 68%. Over the past forty years, death due to cervical cancer has dropped by more than 50% due to the use of the Pap test (http://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/cervical-cancer/statistics).

HPV is responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer, with HPV 16 and 18 accounting for more than seventy percent of all cervical cancers. HPV is a very common virus that is transmitted by skin-to-skin contact. Many HPV infections go away by themselves but when they persist they can lead to cervical cancer. Other cancers also associated with HPV include cancer of the vagina, vulva, penis, anus, rectum, and oropharynx (cancers of the back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils). The goal of vaccination is to prevent a lasting HPV infection after a person is exposed to the virus. (http://www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/prevention-and-healthy-living/hpv-and-cancer)

We hope you will join us and learn more about cervical cancer.

We will use these questions to guide our chat:

T1: Which HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) types cause cervical cancer? How does the HPV vaccination prevent cancer? 

T2: What other health issues and cancers are associated with HPV? Why is the vaccine recommended for both boys and girls?

T3: What are the tools we have to catch cervical cancer in the pre-cancer and early stages? What do we need to know re: guidelines? 

T4: What are options for fertility preservation? What fertility and general resources can help women diagnosed with cervical disease? 

T5: There is still a lot of stigma surrounding women's cancers. How can we ensure ALL women receive the necessary education.

Feel free to read the Cancer.Net website (http://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/cervical-cancer/introduction) and the CDC website (https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/hpv/statistics/cases.htm) for more information on cervical cancer and HPV.

See you on Wed the 8th!

Dee
#gyncsm Co-Founder